Hallmark: When You Care Enough to Send More Than an Email

Update: I have now published a list of all made in USA greeting cards I have found.

Hallmark cards conjure up images of warm and fuzzy thoughts, reflections on sentimental and tender expressions. Hallmark’s saccharin-laced messages can also push the boundaries on good taste. However you feel about Hallmark, they are the country’s largest manufacturer of greeting cards, and their store turned up quite a few made in America surprises.

Made in USA Item found: All of the traditional paper  Hallmark cards in the store were made in the USA. The musical cards containing electronic components are made in China. Gifts made in the America included Yankee Candles, Asher’s Chocolates and books.

Most common countries of origin: USA (cards), China (gifts/collectibles)

Made in USA Alternatives: See Greeting Cards Made in USA.

Corporate information: Based in Kansas City, Hallmark remains a family operated company with deep roots in their community. With factories in six states, Hallmark employs 7,700 employees nationally, over half of its total workforce. The company has built a reputation for community involvement, their efforts in boosting the local economy of Kansas City in particular have won them humanitarian awards. They have also received nods from The Human Rights Campaign and Working Mother’s Best Companies Report for creating positive work environments. Though the majority of Hallmark cards are made in America, in 2009 they laid off and outsourced about 7% of their domestic workforce, citing economic hardships.

Overall: Although Hallmarks’ layoffs have sparked outcry, my analysis on the situation is focused on the positives. The truth is that many companies have exclusively outsourced their manufacturing, and in today’s economic climate I am happy to find companies that manage to retain their made in America products. I did a quick experiment when I returned home to confirm my findings. Being the stereotypical first time Mom, I saved all the cards my son received in February for his first birthday. Of the nineteen cards he received, six were Hallmark cards, and all six were made in America.

Giving Hallmark cards may not be as eco-friendly as sending an “e-card”, but most of us are going to continue shopping for cards for birthday gifts and other special occasions. Look no further than Pinterest for inspiration on how to reuse greeting cards into everything from wreaths to ornaments.

The next time you are shopping for a greeting card, take the extra second to flip the card over and see where it was made. Do you prefer getting cards in the mail as opposed to e-cards? Does it matter to you where they were made?     

Check out other cards and gifts made in USA on the Made in America Master List.

Comments

    • madeinusachallenge says

      I hadn’t even thought about seed paper, great recommendation! Very pretty for cards and stationary. Need to look into how it is created more, sounds very interesting.

  1. Beth says

    I miss the art of correspondance…stationary sets, greeting cards, post cards. My grandmothers were good at this and gave me writing tools as gifts. I’m grateful to still have friends that don’t have computers!
    Beth recently posted..Review & Giveaway: Postcardly!

  2. Carolyn says

    Hallmark boxed card are all made in China except for the Hallmark UNICEF cards. The cards that are made in the USA and can grow into flowers can be found at this website: http://www.greenpromise.com/resources/environmentally-friendly-christmas-cards.php

    More Christmas cards and gifts made in the USA can be found at this website: http://www.nortonsusa.com/Christmas-Carolers-Embossed-Boxed-Cards-1-PP-91040.htm

    Here’s to a very merry “Made in the USA Christmas” in 2011.

    • madeinusachallenge says

      Carolyn,
      Thanks for the great resources. Those cards that can be planted are an awesome idea! Thanks for sharing.

  3. maria says

    i see you’re in kop…i’m 15 mins away :)
    i love your blog…so versatile.
    i love cards. love receiving them in the mail…
    emails are great, but there’s something so special about a card being mailed to you.
    wonderful post.
    looking forward to reading more <3
    xo
    maria

    • madeinusachallenge says

      Thanks Maria! I love from hearing from other locals! I agree that receiving a card in the mail is a special delight that an email can’t touch!

  4. says

    Great article,

    As one who had always purchased Halmark cards, and always go out of my way to buy American, I was concened when I got email stating that their cards were manufactured in China. Nice to know it was not true. Wake up America, Buy American.
    http://Secret-Anti-Aging-Skincare.com

  5. Judy Karol says

    I am so glad to know you do your business in mainly the USA.
    I have seen things saying not to buy Hallmark and so I checked it out and will dispell that theory!.
    Thanks you for keeping with the USA…….we need those jobs.

  6. Gayle says

    Just wondering if Hallmark was the only greeting card company looked into for American made products? What about the obvious one…American Greetings? American is right in their name; aren’t they US made?

  7. Janie Hartman says

    Can find no ornaments made in the USA…Can no longer find boxed Christmas cards made in the USA.IT IS SUCH A SHAME.

  8. Kristi says

    I found some boxed Christmas cards that are made in the USA just yesterday! They are made by Leanin’ Tree, and I found them at a store called Atwoods in Oklahoma. You can see them on the Leanin’ Tree website: http://www.leanintree.com/

  9. Dan says

    Hallmark Christmas cards at Walgreen’s were all made in China. More than half of the boxed cards at the Hallmark store were also made in China. Bought American Greeting Xmas cards at Dollar Tree. (2 for $1.00)

  10. Shirley McDonald says

    I’m so glad to see that most Hallmark products are American made. I purchase many things from my local Hallmark store and had heard that the cards are made in China. Good news!

  11. Anna M. Odom says

    Just found a Hallmark Valentine card that my father sent my mother and was wondering if u could tell me what year it miglht have been madwe. The numbers on the back are 50v 370-4 victorian fold out in three tiers love it and i am going to frame it but would like a little background so to pass on. Their story is not unique just a love story , who struggled but remained married for 51 years before my fathers passing in 1998 . Mother passed in 2003 but their love continues through us.

  12. Carolyn says

    I am very pleased to report that Hallmark made more of their 2012 boxed Christmas cards in this country. While the majority of Hallmark boxed Christmas cards are still made in China, it is possible to buy lovely boxed Christmas cards at Hallmark that are made here. Just look for the words “made in USA” on the back of the box.

  13. dAN ANDERSON says

    I was at my local Walmart yesterday, and had picked out several beautiful Hallmark cards, when I happened to glance on the back and see they were all made in China!! As someone based out of Minneapolis, living in China, trying to sell equipment to the Chinese market to keep jobs back in Minnesota, I was very disgusted to see HALLMARK, as a Kansas City company were giving these jobs to a Chinese operation. Greeting cards are very obviously a high margin product where the actual production cost plays very little in the cost to the end user, and it appears absolutely unnecessary for HALLMARK to have farmed out this work to the Chinese. I immediately put THESE cards back, and picked up some American Greetings cards, which of course were made in the USA. Again, I am extremely disappointed HALLMARK have made this business decision and will not be shy to express my concern to Walmart and social media outlets.

    Sincerely yours,
    Dan Anderson

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